International Conference on
Alternative and Traditional Medicine

Theme : Exploring the Scientific Efficacy of Alternative and Traditional Medicine

Scientific Program Day 1 - Jul 23, 2018

Kindly submit your abstract in detail about the topic that you are going to present in this Conference in about 300 to 400 words. Besides the abstract, add briefly about yourself, your profession, your experience, your skills, your publications, your talks, your presentations, and any other info which you find relevant to this conference. Kindly download the Submission Form. Fill it up and send it to us. After your abstract is accepted at our end the registration process begins.  

Key Note 1

Edzard Ernst

University of Exeter, ,Germany

Title: Integrative Medicine: Hype or Hope?

Time : 09:15 - 09:55

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Biography:

Professor Ernst qualified as a physician in Germany where he also completed his MD and PhD theses. He was Professor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PMR) at Hannover Medical School (Germany) and Head of the PMR Department at the University of Vienna (Austria). He came to the University of Exeter in 1993 to establish the first Chair in Complementary Medicine. Since 2012, he is Emeritus Professor at the University of Exeter.

Abstract:

Integrated medicine - or integrative medicine, healthcare etc. (IM) - is based mainly on two concepts. Firstly, practitioners of IM believe in looking after the whole individual: body, mind and soul. At first glance, this approach seems laudable. Yet it ignores that all good medicine is, was, and always will be holistic. It follows that the promotion of holism under the banner of IM is either superfluous (because it misleads us into believing that holism is an exclusive feature of IM, while it is a hallmark of any good healthcare), or - if holism is neglected in a particular branch of medicine - it detracts us from the important task to remedy this deficit.Secondly, proponents of IM claim to use the “best of both words”, i. e. combines the “best” of the world of Traditional/Alternative Medicine with the “best” of conventional healthcare. Again, this concept seems commendable, but we have to ask, what does “best” mean? In a medical context, “best” can only signify “being associated with the most convincingly positive risk/benefit balance”. Thus, this concept becomes synonymous with evidence-based medicine (EBM). Therefore, this duplicity is superfluous; it would only distract from the auspicious efforts of EBM to continuously improve healthcare for the benefit of our patients.

Key Note 2

Mary Lou Galantino

The Richard Stockton College of NJ, University of Pennsylvania ,United States

Title: Yoga for Persons with HIV-related Neuropathy

Time : 09:55 - 10:35

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Mary Lou Galantino, PT, MS, PhD, MSCE, a distinguished professor at Stockton University, has been conducting research and treating patients in cancer rehabilitation for more than 30 years. Her passion for her work increased after she had her own experience with cancer. Prior to her cancer diagnosis, Dr. Galantino had been an NIH fellow at the University of Pennsylvania researching the impact of meditation and how the practice of meditation can help a range of populations, including cancer patients.

Abstract:

Distal sensory polyneuropathy (DSP) is a common complication of HIV disease. DSP-related pain has been associated with disability, reduced quality of life (QOL) and impaired function. Yoga has been shown to improve mental and physical status in people with a number of chronic diseases. Our  purpose was to assess feasibility and measure the impact of 4 weeks of yoga in persons with HIV-related DSP in the feet, of 55 patients scheduled at a HIV pain clinic over 6 months, 22 had DSP. Four completed the study. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of HIV disease and DSP in the feet, controlled HIV disease status, average foot pain of at least 4/10, sensory symptoms in the feet, and an established regime of pharmacologic management. The age range was 33-64 years (mean 52.3 years). Time since HIV diagnosis ranged from 7 months-30 years (mean 18.4 years). Time since diagnosis of DSP ranged from 7 months-15 years (mean 8.1 years). Baseline mean rating of average foot pain was 5.3/10. At baseline, one participant had been hospitalized 7 months prior due to meningitis, used a walker for ambulation, and had lower extremity (LE) impairments that were not related to DSP. Participants engaged in twice weekly yoga classes for 4 weeks. Five-time sit-to-stand test improved in all participants at W5, with sustained improvement at W9 in 3.  Six-minute walk test distances showed clinically meaningful improvement in 3 participants at W5, and the gains were sustained at W9 in 2.  Multi-directional reach test performance to the side (left or right) and forward improved in most cases at W5 with carryover to W9 in some instances. One participant improved in the backward direction at W5 and W9.  Great toe vibratory sensation threshold (tested with a biothesiometer) improved (bilaterally) in the participant that had a history of meningitis at W5 and W9. For one participant, Pain Severity and Pain Interference improved at W5 and W9, and Average Pain improved by W9. The other 3 participants had similar pain scores over time, as measured with the Brief Pain Inventory. However, pain-related quality of life (QOL) (from pain subscales of the MOS-HIV) improved by >20% for all participants at W5, and gains were sustained for 2 at W9. Mental Health Summary QOL and Physical Health Summary QOL scores improved for all participants at W5, with sustained improvement at W9 in 3.  Self-reported LE function (as measured with the LEFS and LLFI) improved (on both instruments) in 1 participant at W5 and W9.  Disability scores (assessed via WHO-DAS and HDQ) were in general unchanged, although one participant had an improved HDQ score at W5.

Key Note 3

Yu-Chiang Hung,

Chang Gung University College of Medicine, ,Taiwan

Title: Reduction in Postpartum Weight with Laser Acupuncture: A randomized Control Trial

Time : 10:35 - 11:15

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Biography:

Yu-Chiang Hung grew up in Taiwan and received his Bachelor's degree from the China Medical University in 1990, another M.D. degree from the National Yang-Ming University in 1992, and Ph.D. degree from the Chang Gung University in 2010. His PhD thesis was “Functional proteomic study in bioactive compounds of radix Salvia miltiorrhiza”. Dr. Hung had found that Salvia miltiorrhiza could inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation to treat atherosclerosis. He is an attending and director of Department of Chinese medicine in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital now. His specialty is Chinese medicine, cardiovascular diseases, Chinese herbs, and acupuncture.

Abstract:

Gestational weight gain and weight retention at 1 year after delivery are associated with long-term obesity. We aimed to investigate the effect of laser acupuncture therapy on postpartum weight control. We randomly assigned 66 subjects with postpartum weight retention to a laser acupuncture group and control group. The subjects were treated at acupoint including the stomach and hunger points of the ear, ST25, ST28, ST40, SP15, CV9, and SP6 by using verum or sham laser acupuncture over 5 sessions per week. After 12 treatment sessions, the differences in the body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage (BFP), and waist-to-buttocks ratio (WBR) of the patients were analyzed and compared between the laser acupuncture and control groups via analysis of variance, chi-square tests, and stepwise regression tests.

Sessions

Selected Lectures
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Biography:

Dr. Soad K. Al Jaouni is a Professor & Consultant  of  Hematology and Professor/Consultant of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Senior Researcher  at Hematology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University Hospital  a tertiary care  medical center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. November 1989 had a certificate of The Royal College of Physician and Surgeon in Medicine. Specialty Hematology, Toronto University, Canada. Maintenance Certificate 2005. February 1990 and March 2006 had a Fellow Certificate of The Royal College of  Physician and   Surgeon of Canada. June 1990 had a Clinical Fellowship in Pediatric  Hematology/Oncology Sick Kid Hospital, Toronto University Canada. Yearly participate in International & Local Conferences with more than 280  research and  109 publications and have 2 US Patents.Initiate in 1991 the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at King Abdulaziz University Hospital.Prof./Dr. Al Jaouni is well known for her dedication active role in research on hereditary blood disease, nutrition and cancer research. Lately  more interest in the quality of life, natural products & traditional medicine research and supportive care. She have an active role in public education to minimized and control inherited blood diseases,  environmental pollution and cancer prevention.

Abstract:

To assess the effect of wet cupping on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of adult patients with chronic medical conditions, who were referred to the Cupping Clinic of King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A controlled, quasi-experimental study design was carried out among 629 patients referred for cupping from the KAUH Specialty Clinics, during the period from January to December 2014. Patients in the intervention group (309 patients) completed a pre-test included WHO quality of life-BREF, received one wet-cupping session, and filled-out the post-test (1 month later). Patients in the control group (320 patients) completed the pre-test during their enrollment in the study and post-test one month later. Both groups received their ordinary treatment. Descriptive and inferential statistics were performed.  Results: Pain was the most common cause for cupping referral. After cupping intervention, the mean scores of most of the HRQOL domains, especially the physical domain, improved significantly among patients in the intervention group. The mean total score of physical HRQOL domain was 61.6 ± 13.6 before cupping, and reached 69.7 ± 12.6 after intervention (paired t-test=11.3, p=0.000). Improvements in HRQOL were noticed for almost all types of pain and other medical conditions.  Conclusion: There are promising effects in favor of using wet cupping for improving HRQOL of patients with chronic conditions. Cupping is recommended as a complementary treatment modality for chronic medical conditions, especially pain.

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Biography:

Mosaburo Kainuma completed his PhD at Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University in2003. He is currently an associate professor of the Graduate School of Medical Science of Kyushu University where he focuses his energy on the education of medical students. His specialties are Kampo medicine and community medicine. His main target of research is objectivity in the diagnosis of the Kampo medicine. He has published more than 35 papers and serves as an editor of the Journal of Traditional ? Kampo Medicine of the Japanese Society for Oriental Medicine.

Abstract:

This study was done to investigate the associations between tongue color (TC), endoscopic findings, and Gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was done for 919 residents of Ishigaki Island, Okinawa. The data of 896 from whom we were able to obtain consent for tongue color and blood testing was available for analysis. The Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) was available for 886 residents. FSSG ≥8 and the presence of mucosal break by endoscopy were defined as reflux esophagitis (RE), with no erosive esophagitis it was defined as non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). TC was measured by the device-independent international commission on Illumination 1976L*a*b* color space standards at four points: (1) edge, (2) posterior, (3) middle, and (4) apex. We also calculated the ratio of the tongue edge to the three other measured points to examine their association with the coating of the tongue. Of the 896 residents, 425 residents were divided into a single endoscopic finding positive group (n=207) and a negative group, which served as a control (n=218). The most frequent single endoscopic finding was esophageal hernia (n=110), followed by erosive gastritis (EG) (n=45). TC 3a* and 3b* were significant in the multivariate analysis of EG (OR 2.66 P=0.008, OR 2.17 P=0.045). Of the residents tested, the endoscopic findings identified 36 with RE and 116 with NERD. Sex and TC (3b*/1b*) were significant in the multivariate analysis of RE (OR 4.82 P<0.001, OR3.59 P=0.018). TC analysis would be a useful, accurate, non-invasive screening method for Gastro esophageal disease.

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Biography:

Erica Saccente is a Board-Certified Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner who provides psychiatric treatment to people with HIV/AIDS and people with histories of incarceration at the Institute for Advanced Medicine at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital. She also has a small private practice in NYC, where she integrates Yoga and Tibetan Buddhism into psychotherapy. Erica has an undergraduate degree in neuroscience, and she completed her graduate studies at Columbia University School of Nursing. She has been studying and practicing Yoga and Tibetan Buddhism for many years. Erica is a certified Yoga Teacher, and she has studied extensively with the Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science. She has certificates in Mindfulness and Compassion-based Contemplative Psychotherapy, and she teaches the Nalanda Institute’s Compassion-Based Resiliency Training program.

Abstract:

People with histories of incarceration endure numerous hardships including coping with the psychological impact of incarceration, trying to find adequate housing and employment, re-connecting with family, adjusting to cultural changes, addressing medical needs, establishing a trustworthy support network, and facing societal stigma. This population has frequently endured trauma (whether during incarceration or beforehand), and many struggle with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), substance use disorders, and other co-morbid psychiatric illnesses. There is a growing body of evidence regarding the benefits of yoga and meditation in addressing mental health issues. Yoga and meditation are particularly useful adjunctive treatments in formerly incarceration persons, as they can improve mental health outcomes and provide people with effective skills to cope with the difficulties experienced after release from incarceration, which can help reduce rates of recidivism. We will explore the ways in which philosophy, breath work, gentle movement, and guided meditation from the traditions of Yoga and Tibetan Buddhism have been helpful in treating the mental health needs of people readjusting to society after incarceration. We will discuss recent findings in neuroscience that may explain how these adjunctive therapies help with trauma recovery, self-regulation, and fostering resilience.

Yao-Chin Hsu

Chi Mei Medical Center , Taiwan

Title: Controlling cardiac Arrhythemia by Chinese Medicine

Time : 13:45 - 14:15

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Doctor Hsu Yao-Chin has completed his PhD at the age of 38 years from the University of Chinese Medicine in Taiwan. He is the director of the department of Chinese Medicine in Chi-Mei Medical center and a Specialist of Intergrated Chinese and Western medicine

Abstract:

Arrhythemia is any rhythm that is not normal sinus rhythm with normal atrioventricular conduction. Symptoms caused by cardiac arrhythemia can include palpitations, dizziness, chest tightness, neck discomfort, syncope, chest discomfort, dyspnea, and anxiety. Doctors can diagnose patients with arrhythmia by 24 hours Holter recording, event recording, or electrophysiological study. Treatments include antiarrhythmic drugs, pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation. However, all antiarrhythmic drugs have the potential to increase ectopy or induce or aggravate arrhythmia. Surgery also has its own disadvantages such as high costs and an increased risk of having atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Not surprisingly, many patients have turned to Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for help. By applying Chinese medicine according to the holistic differential diagnosis theory, we had often controlled arrhythemia quickly and effectively, the following is some of our experience: (1) Controlling Paroxysmal Atrial Flutter in admitted patient: The holistic differential diagnosis is Yang deficiency of the heart and kidney with the retention of fluid. Ginseng and Praeparata Decoction combined Zhenwu Decoction were prescribed. (2) Controlling Sick Sinus Syndrome: The diagnosis was Yang deficiency of the heart and kidney combined with Qi and Blood deficiency. Heart-Nourishing Decoction combined with Rehmannia Eight Formula wereprescribed. (3) Controlling Atrial fibrillation of Rheumatic heart valvular disease: The diagnosis is Yang-deficiency of the Heart combined with Qi and Blood Deficiency. The Roasted Liquorice Decoction combined with Ginseng and Aconiti Praeparatae Decoction were prescribed. (4) Controlling Atrio-ventricular Premature Beats and Atrial fibrillation: The diagnosis is Deficiency of Qi and Blood combined with Heart and Spleen. Guei Pyi Decotion combined with Wen-Dan Decotion were prescribed Chinese Medicine provided an effective alternative treatment for cardiac arrhythemia.

Stephen Cavallino

Hackett Hemwall Association , Italy

Title: Proloterapia in Malattie Degenerative

Time : 14:15 - 14:45

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Stephen Cavallino is a director of European school of Proloterapia & he is  trying to specialize in solving problems of origin
musculo-skeletal. Specialist in non-surgical orthopedic regenerative therapy(prolotherapy and neuroprolotherapy)

Abstract:

The pain becomes chronic and persistent if it develops over the course of a disease. Chronic pain has a negative impact on all aspects of an individual's life, including emotional elements, physical, financial and social. Chronic pain of each member of a family dramatically affects the whole family. Prolotherapy is an American method used in the U.S.A. for nearly 60 years, it is known as a non-surgical treatment for reconstruction of the ligaments, tendons, joints musculoskeletal apparatus. First of all it is important to understand the word "Prolo" which derives from the Latin "Proles" (NPT) which means "Stimulation of Growth." In "Prolotherapy" is used a solution of glucose (sugar and water) which is infiltrated directly into the damaged ligament or tendon / sufferer which is "attached" to the bone. In this weak area after the infiltration of glucose is created a local acute inflammatory reaction with increased perfusion bleeds and the interest of the cell repair factors that determine a true "self-repair". The "Prolotherapy" has established itself as a non-surgical treatment for the reconstruction of ligaments and chronic pain. The "Prolotherapy" is a Real Pain solution without surgery, without drugs, without rest or work disability, suitable for all, men and women, young and old, sportsmen and athletes, for all those people who want to solve the chronic pain problems without resorting to surgery.

Marion Pérard

Universitätsmedizin, , Germany

Title: Merger of Conventional and Complementary Medicine in a Clinic Department.

Time : 14:45 - 15:15

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Marion Pérard studied in France at the Business and ManagementSchool of Grenoble. Due to personal health problems, she decided to combine conventional and traditional medicine to enhance her healing process. In doing so, she faces many problems to bring both medicines together forthe treatment. From her business background she engaged herself in opening solutions and possibilities out of the business world toward integrative medicine for clinics and clinic departments. On this subject, she published three papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Over the last years, patient’s demandfor complementary medicine has increased. An increasing number of clinics facing this market development react by implementing integrative medical services in their offering. Corporate culture plays an important rolein business mergers. Its aspects can be transferred in other fields. The purpose is to create a concept for a cultural combination of conventional medicine and complementary medicine (=integrative medicine) in clinics. Therefore, it applies different methodical approaches and considers both medical and businessissuesfocusing on the significance of corporate culture in business mergers. The workis based on three primary approach:a literature research, a qualitative case study (Germany and USA), andan expert-symposium.The case study has shown that the selected clinics developed a similar corporate culture even though that had chosen a different integration type with focuson research, evidence-based treatments, a holistic and patient-centered approach.Based on a literature research, the cultural key aspects in conventional medicine were identified as scientific, analytic, standardized and routine-oriented, whereas the relating aspects in complementary medicine were classified as holistic, empowering, individualistic and time-consuming. In merger theory, the differences of the corporate culture were identified as risks for mergers. Recommendations to overcome cultural differences were developedduring the symposium. A checklist provides milestones for creating and maintaining the integration of both medicines in a clinic. Both conventional medicine and complementary medicine have developed different corporate cultures. The differences may be obstacles for their integration. Therefore, for the success of integration, it is essential to build bridges between the two cultures and to consider management and strategical aspects.

Yuh-Chiang Shen

National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine , Taiwan

Title: Common and Unique Mechanisms of Chinese Herbal Remedies on Ischemic Stroke Mice Revealed by Transcriptome Analyses

Time : 15:15 - 15:45

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Yuh-Chiang Shen has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from National Yangming University and postdoctoral studies from Natinal Health Research Institute (NHRI) and National Research Insttitute of Chinese Medicine (NRICM), Taipei. He is the director of division of Clinical Chinese Medicne, NRICM, the only officical Institute in Taiwan for Chinese herabal medicine. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member 

Abstract:

Four traditional Chinese herbal remedies (CHR) including Buyang Huanwu decoction (BHD), Xuefu Zhuyu decoction (XZD), Tianma Gouteng decoction (TGD) and Shengyu decoction (SYD) are popular used in treating brain-related dysfunction clinically with different syndrome/pattern based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) principles, yet their neuroprotective mechanisms are still unclear. Materials and methods: Mice were subjected to an acute ischemic stroke to examine the efficacy and molecular mechanisms of action underlying these CHR. Results: CHR treatment significantly enhanced the survival rate of stroke mice, with BHD being the most effective CHR. All CHR were superior to recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment in successfully ameliorating brain function, infarction, and neurological deficits in stroke mice that also paralleled to improvements in blood-brain barrier damage, inflammation, apoptosis, and neurogenesis. Transcriptome analyses reveals that a total of 774 ischemia-induced probe sets were significantly modulated by four CHR, including 52 commonly upregulated genes and 54 commonly downregulated ones. Among them, activation of neurogenesis-associated signaling pathways and down-regulating inflammation and apoptosis pathways are key common mechanisms in ischemic stroke protection by all CHR. Besides, levels of plasma CX3CL1 and S100a9 in patients could be used as biomarkers for therapeutic evaluation before functional recovery could be observed. Conclusion: Our results suggest that using CHR, a combinatory cocktail therapy, is a better way than rt-PA for treating cerebral ischemic-associated diseases through modulating a common as well as a specific group of genes/pathways that may partially explain the syndrome differentiation and treatment principle in TCM.

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Biography:

Corjena Cheung, PhD, MS, RN, FGSA completed her doctoral education in Complementary Therapies and Healing Practices, and post-doctoral training in Gerontological Nursing.  She is now an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. A nurse educator and researcher, she is passionate about discovering new knowledge and ways to manage health. She conducts research about complementary and integrative therapies to manage symptoms, promote physical activity and quality of life, and prevent disability in community dwelling older adults with chronic health conditions such as osteoarthritis and Parkinson's.  She has published more than 25 articles in reputable journals and presented boardly at national and international conferences.        

Abstract:

Although exercise is often recommended for managing osteoarthritis (OA), limited evidence-based exercise options are available for older adults with OA. This study compared the effects of Hatha yoga (HY) and aerobic/strengthening exercises (ASE) on knee OA. Randomized controlled trial with three arms design was used: HY, ASE, and education control. Both HY and ASE groups involved 8 weekly 45-min group classes with 2-4 days/week home practice sessions. Control group received OA education brochures and weekly phone calls from study staff. Standardized instruments were used to measure OA symptoms, physical function, mood, spiritual health, fear of falling, and quality of life at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. HY/ASE adherences were assessed weekly using class attendance records and home practice video recordings. Primary analysis of the difference in the change from baseline was based on intent-to-treat and adjusted for baseline values. Eight-three adults with symptomatic knee OA completed the study (84% female; mean age 71.6 ± 8.0 years; mean BMI 29.0 ± 7.0 kg/m2). Retention rate was 82%. Compared to the ASE group at 8 weeks, participants in the HY group had a significant improvement from baseline in perception of OA symptoms (-9.6 [95% CI -15.3, -4]; p = .001), anxiety (-1.4 [95% CI -2.7, -0]; p = .04), and fear of falling (-4.6 [-7.5, -1.7]; p = .002). There were no differences in class/home practice adherence between HY and ASE. Three non-serious adverse events were reported from the ASE group. Both HY and ASE improved symptoms and function but HY may have superior benefits for older adults with knee OA.

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Biography:

Yongqiong Zhang is a professor at China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences ,China. He  had Published several papers  in International Journals.

Abstract:

Tripterysium glycosides (TG) tablet has been extensively used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with better therapeutic effects than several first-line disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs according to recent clinical observations. However, not all RA patients benefit to the same extent from the TG therapy, which emphasizes the need of predictive biomarkers and tools for response to TG tablet.  Methods: Herein, we detected predictive biomarkers for response to TG tablet from two perspectives: (1) Integrating TG tablet response-related miRNA and mRNA expression profiles obtained from the clinical cohort-based microarray, miRNA target prediction, miRNA-target gene coexpression, as well as gene-gene interactions, to identify candidate serum miRNA biomarkers that were predictive of response to TG tablet; (2) Combining TG tablet response-related gene expression profiles obtained from the clinical cohort-based microarray, differential expression data analysis and gene signal transduction network analysis, to explicit candidate serum gene biomarkers of response to TG tablet.  Four candidate serum miRNA biomarkers (hsa-miR-550b-2-5p, hsa-miR-4797-5p, hsa-miR-6509-5p, hsa-miR-378g), and six genes (MX1, OASL, SPINK1, CRK, GRAPL, RNF2) were identified as candidate biomarkers predicting individual response to TG tablet. Both the 5-fold cross-validation and the independent clinical cohort validations showed the high predictive accuracy and area under ROC curve of these candidate biomarkers, demonstrating their good performance of predicting RA patients' response to TG tablet.  Conclusions: Candidate serum miRNA biomarkers (hsa-miR-550b-2-5p, hsa-miR-4797-5p, hsa-miR-6509-5p, hsa-miR-378g), and six genes (MX1, OASL, SPINK1, CRK, GRAPL, RNF2) may be novel targets for RA therapeutic intervention, and may have promising prognostic value in RA patients treated with TG tablet. 

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Biography:

Dr Aminudin has completed her PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Malaya, MALAYSIA in 2004. She spent 2 years as visiting scholar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) USA (2000-2002). She is currently an Associate Professor in the Biochemistry Program, Institute of Biological Sciences. Her main research interests are natural product and drug discovery, traditional medicine and proteomics.  She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as reviewer for various journals. 

Abstract:

Hypertension appears to be affecting aging population in most countries and in some cases it leads to death. Inhibition of ACE has been viewed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. Ganoderma lucidum is a medicinal mushroom purported as a potent remedy in the treatment and prevention of several ailments, including hypertension. This study explored the anti-ACE potential of protein fractions from G. lucidum. Mycelia of the mushroom were cultivated by submerged fermentation in a liquid medium containing brown sugar and spent brewer’s yeast. Intracellular proteins were fractionated from mycelia crude water extract by ammonium sulphate precipitation, and their ACE inhibitory activity was evaluated. The potential anti-ACE protein fractions were further separated by RP-HPLC and characterized using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Result demonstrated that the mycelia crude water extract inhibited ACE at IC50 value of 1.134 ± 0.036 mg/mL. Following protein fractionation and HPLC purification, highly potential anti-ACE protein fraction with the IC50 values less than 200 μg/mL was detected. Characterization of proteins in this active fraction demonstrated the presence of four different antihypertensive-related proteins involved in the regulation of blood pressure through different mechanisms. This could suggests that G. lucidum has high potential in lowering blood pressure level due to the presence of several antihypertensive-related proteins such as cystathionine beta synthase-, DEAD/DEAH box helicase-, paxillin-, and alpha/beta hydrolase-like proteins.

Liu Ying

Chinese Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine , China

Title: Building Quality Assurance system to ensure the Clinical Efficacy of Chinese medicine

Time : 17:30 - 18:00

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Biography:

XiaoYongqing, born in June 1950 in Wuhan,Hubei province. He got the doctor degree of pharmacy from Japan Osaka Pharmaceutical University. He is a chief researcher of Institute of Chinese material Medica, Chinese academy of Chinese medical sciences (ICMM, CACMS), and a member of academic board and academic degrees committee in CACMS. He is Supervisor for Ph.D. Candidate of China medicine academy of sciences. He is a famous chemical and processing expert of China and the research leader of key subjects of processing traditional Chinese medicine of state Administration of traditional Chinese medicine, P.R.C., enjoying “special government allowances”.Xiao mainly engaged in the research of the effective components of traditional Chinese medicine and its compatibility, the quality standard and processing of traditional Chinese medicine.

Abstract:

For the purpose of stabilizing and improving the clinical curative effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), processing technology, energy-saving and rapid drying technology, process control technology, quality evaluation technology, packaging and bar code identification technology for quality guarantee of TCM should be built up. These technologies are the core to set up quality guarantee system and ensure clinical curative effect of TCMs.