International Conference on
Alternative and Traditional Medicine

Theme : Exploring the Scientific Efficacy of Alternative and Traditional Medicine

Scientific Program Day 2 - Jul 24, 2018

Kindly submit your abstract in detail about the topic that you are going to present in this Conference in about 300 to 400 words. Besides the abstract, add briefly about yourself, your profession, your experience, your skills, your publications, your talks, your presentations, and any other info which you find relevant to this conference. Kindly download the Submission Form. Fill it up and send it to us. After your abstract is accepted at our end the registration process begins.  

Key Note 1

Mary Lou Galantino

The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, University of Pennsylvania. ,United States

Title: Impact of Yoga on Functional Outcomes in Breast Cancer Survivors with Aromatase Inhibitor-Associated Arthralgia’s

Time : 09:15 - 09:50

No Image
Biography:

Mary Lou Galantino, a distinguished professor at Stockton University, has been conducting research and treating patients in cancer rehabilitation for more than 30 years. Her passion for her work increased after she had her own experience with cancer. Prior to her cancer diagnosis, Dr. Galantino had been an NIH fellow at the University of Pennsylvania researching the impact of meditation and how the practice of meditation can help a range of populations, including cancer patients.

Abstract:

Arthralgia affects postmenopausal breast cancer survivors (BCS) receiving aromatase inhibitors (AI) which may result in reduced function and long term wellbeing.  While there is evidence for yoga to improve subjective report of Quality of Life (QOL) in various cancer populations, no studies reported objective functional improvement associated with yoga.  This study aims to establish the feasibility of studying the impact of yoga on objective functional outcomes for AI-associated arthralgia (AIAA). 

Postmenopausal women with stage I-III breast cancer who reported AIAA were enrolled in a single arm feasibility trial.  Yoga was provided twice a week for 8 weeks and participants were instructed to do a home-based yoga program thrice weekly An Iyengar yoga program was specifically developed with emphasis on postures, breathing and meditation while attending the safety concerns for individuals with musculoskeletal pain.  Certified instructors led the yoga sessions for 1.5 hours with a 15 minute check-in period to assess progress and function.  The Sit and Reach (SR), and Functional Reach (FR) were evaluated by trained physical therapists and served as the primary outcomes.  Self-reported Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) and FACT-B were secondary outcomes. Paired-t tests were used for analysis. 

Key Note 2

Domenico V. Delfino

University of Perugia ,Italy

Title: Vietnam Traditional Medicine from a Western Perspective

Time : 09:50 - 10:25

No Image
Biography:

Domenico V. Delfino completed his Ph.D. in experimental medicine at University of Rome “La Sapienza” and had worked as research associate at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, USA.  He is currently associate professor of pharmacology at the Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Italy.  He is the head of Foligno Nursing School and member of the ethical committee of University of Perugia.  He has published more than 50 papers in reputed international journals and participated to more than 60 international conferences.     

Abstract:

In Vietnam, two types of traditional medicine are practiced: Thou nam, medicine of the South, and Thuoc BAC, medicine of the North.  The latter, in particular, is the result of many medical exchanges between China and Vietnam during the Song, Jin and Yuan periods.  In the Sino-Vietnam border, people are used to chewing betel, which has been recorded in Chinese medical books, and is used in Vietnam, together with areca nuts and small pieces of Artocarpus tonkinensis (At) bark in the so-called Trau Cau, wisch is chewed for social and hygiene purposes.  Among ethnic minorities border At leaves are also used for the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis and backache.  This is part of the folk and herbal Vietnamese traditional medicine (VTM) which are the most used modalities of VTM together with acupuncture.  We have recently validated medicinal plants emerging from VTM by Western approaches.  Different flavonol and proanthocyanidin glycosides were isolated from Artocarpus t. decoction and maesopsin 4-O-β-D-glucoside is the most abundant.  This compound inhibits proliferation and up-regulates HO-1, SRXN1 and BCAS3 genes in acute myeloid cells in vitro and shows anticancer activity in vivo.  Additional ethnomedicinal plants tested for their bioactivity were Dacrycarpus imbricatus and Peristrophe bivalvis with compounds isolated from bark and leaves, respectively. We emphasize that, although Vietnam has a very rich collection of tradional medicinal herbal drugs, these therapies should be biologically and clinically validated with modern Western methods for a more rationale usage in global populations.

Key Note 3

Karin Lenger

Institute for Scientific Homeopathy ,Germany

Title: Homeopathy is an Energetic Medicine healing by Magnetic Photons according to the Resonance Principle

Time : 10:25 - 11:00

No Image
Biography:

Karin Lenger studied Biochemistry at the Universities of Tubingen and Cologne/Germany. She worked as a Research Assistant at the Medical University of Lubbock/Germany performing her biochemical enzymatic studies: enzymatic gene regulation, cancer research. Working as a Lecturer for classical homeopathy at DHU then as homeopathic practitioner she developed the “biochemical homeopathy”. By scientific proof she detected magnetic photons in high homeopathic potencies by two magnetic resonance methods. She has developed a model of physical and biochemical function of homeopathy. She has a lot of publications and had been invited for speeches on many world congresses in Europe, USA, China, Dubai.

Abstract:

The nature of homeopathy using dilutions beyond the Avogadro number is clarified since Lenger’s detection of magnetic photons by two different magnetic resonance methods: by the Tesla-flatcoil system and delayed luminescence (DL).Separation of the magnetic photons from their carrier substance ethanol or saccharose globules takes place when the measuring system has a bigger resonating frequency field than the field between carrier substance and photons. Characteristic frequency spectra and the potency levels were measurable by the number of photons, using DL or by the characteristic size of the magnetic frequency field separating the photons in dependence on the potency level. Six unknown remedies could be identified by DL. The Law of Similar is expressed like this: the frequencies of the patient must match the frequencies of the remedies. It is assumed that healing takes place firstly quantum physically according to the resonance principle; then the pathological pathways are regulated. This is in agreement with Popp’s quantum physical theory about health and illness and Förster saying that each chemical reaction takes place on a higher energetic level. Homeopathy is a regulation therapy curing both: hyper function and hypo function of a pathological pathway and simultaneously psychological problems by applying its potentized substrates, inhibitors and enzymes.

Key Note 4
No Image
Biography:

Dr.Yukio Yoneda has completed his PhD at the age of 29 years from Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine and postdoctoral studies from City of Hope Research Institute. He has published more than 300 papers in reputed journals. He is still active in serving as an Associate Editor in several international journals, in addition to the Editorial Board in other international scientific journals. As a return of laboratory experimental results to the community, he is developing several dietary supplements beneficial for the prophylaxis of different diseases besides the bench work with colleagues in domestic and foreign universities.

Abstract:

All tea beverages are derived from the identical tea plant “Chanoki” (Camellia sinensis), while the amino acid theanine is enriched in green tea with a molecular structure analogous to glutamine. Four times less incidence of cognitive declines was reported in elderly people with daily green tea than those with daily coffee or black tea following the investigation by physicians for 5 consecutive years in the literature. Significant alleviation was found in cognition ability scores assessed by double-blinded physicians in healthy elderly people given capsules of powdered high quality green tea compared to those with normal grade green tea capsules after daily oral intake for 7 to 12 consecutive months. We focused on the generation of new neurons from neural progenitor cells (NPCs) abundant in embryonic and developing brains.  In our in vitro culture studies using NPCs from embryonic rat and mouse neocortex, adult mouse hippocampus and embryonic carcinoma cells, theanine invariably facilitated proliferation activity for self-renewal along with promotion of the generation of neurons. Theanine markedly up-regulated the glutamine transporter Slc38a1 transcript in rat and mouse progenitors, whereas theanine failed to additionally activate facilitated proliferation and neuronal differentiation in embryonic carcinoma cells with stable overexpression of Slc38a1. Accordingly, theanine would promote embryonic and adult neurogenesis through acting at NPCs in a manner relevant to upregulation of the glutamine transporter Slc38a1 in rodent brains. We have already made several dietary supplement products enriched of theanine supposed to be beneficial for the prophylaxis of particular brain dysfunctions.

Sessions

Selected Lectures

Wen-Long Hu

Chang Gung University College of Medicine , Taiwan

Title: Laser Acupuncture Therapy for Simple Obesity

Time : 11:50 - 12:20

No Image
Biography:

Wen-Long Hu is Deputy Director, Department of Chinese Medicine at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, an adjunct assistant professor at Fooyin University, Kaohsiung Medical University, and Chang Gung University. Wen-Long is President of Taiwan Traditional Chinese Medicine Medical Association. He has the experiences of clinical practice in laser acupuncture therapy for 24 years and in acupuncture for 30 years. He also has the patent of herbal preparation and producing. He has published three books, ten book chapters, and more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

A previous study has shown that laser acupuncture is a useful healing method for the treatment of visceral postmenopausal obesity in combination with a low-calorie diet. We observe and evaluate the therapeutic effect of laser acupuncture in subjects of simple obesity with a non-restrictive diet protocol. Subjects included 73 women and 22 men with simple obesity and body mass indices 27 kg/m2. Daily energy intake recommendations for obese females and males were 1620.0 and 1894.2 kcal in average, respectively. The gallium aluminum arsenide Handylaser Trion was used to apply 0.25 J of energy to each of the following acupuncture points three times per week for four consecutive weeks: Stomach, Hunger, ST25, ST28, ST40, SP15, and CV9. The subjects’ body weights and body mass indices were recorded before treatment, and four weeks after treatment, and the percent reduction in each parameter was calculated. Statistically significant reductions in body weight and body mass index were detected after four weeks of treatment. The mean reduction and mean percent reduction in body weight were 3.17 kg and 3.80% (p < 0.0001), respectively. The corresponding values for the body mass index were 1.22 kg/m2 and 3.78% (p < 0.0001), respectively. We concluded that laser acupuncture was found to exert a therapeutic effect on simple obesity by reducing both body weight and body mass index. Moreover, subjects showed good compliance with this comfortable and non-restrictive diet protocol

No Image
Biography:

Lisa Austin is Health Research Manager based in the University of Bath with an interest in applied health research.  She is also a Research Services Consultant and Manager of a local NHS Research Office in Primary Care.Professor Chris Alford is an Associate Professor in Applied Psychology in the University of the West of England and a founding member of the British Sleep Society with an interest in the effects of sleep loss, sleep disorders, and complementary medicine.Professor Roy Jones is the Director of RICE, a local charity dedicate to the Research and Care of Older People.  Professor Roy Jones is an Honorary Consultant Geriatrician in Bath and an Honorary Professor at both the University of Bath and the University of Bristol.  

Abstract:

Sleep disturbance affects half of all people with dementia and up to 60% ofpeople with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).  Given the unwanted side effects of sleeping tablets including daytime sedation, and positive reports of aromatherapy treatment, this study evaluated the use of Melissa essential oil as a treatment for sleep disturbance. To explore the benefits of Melissa essential oil for people with dementia and mild to moderate cognitive impairment who experience sleep disturbance.Fourteen people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who also had mild to moderate insomnia, as screened by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, were recruited to this study. Participants were tested in three conditions 1. Melissa Oil (treatment), 2. Massage Base Oil (placebo) and 3. No Treatment (control).  For the treatment and placebo conditions, 1 drop (0.29ml) of the oil was placed on the bed clothes at the participants’ home. Participants were then tested for 2 consecutive nights in each condition, with a minimum of 1 night being left between testing to ensure a washout of essential oil.
Sleep activity was tested using a wrist watch, worn by the participants, called “Actiwatch” and side-effects were evaluated using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Statistically positive results were found for the use of Melissa essential oil as a sedative.  No side effects were found.Melissa essential oil was well tolerated, safe and beneficial for the treatment of sleep disturbance in this population.

No Image
Biography:

Wing-Sum Siu has completed his PhD in 2013 from the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is the Project Coordinator (Bone Metabolism) in the Institute of Chinese Medicine of CUHK. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and 3 book chapters.

Abstract:

Patients suffering from musculoskeletal pain and swellings demand many hospital beds and rehabilitation facilities. Traditional Chinese Medicine is offering many alternatives to ameliorate pain and swelling but evidence-based scientific researches supporting their efficacy are insufficient. This study aimed to study the efficacy of a topical use Chinese herbal bath formula (HB) on anti-inflammation and swelling control.The therapeutic mechanisms of HB were studied in vitro via anti-inflammatory, pro-angiogenicand fibroblast proliferation assays on RAW264.7, HUVEC cells and Hs27 cells, respectively. Its in vivo efficacy on angiogenesis, anti-Inflammation and swelling control was studied using zebrafish modeland rat paw edema model, respectively. The sensation of pain, change in paw thickness and inflammation marker in serum were analyzed. A pilot clinical trial was also conducted on patients suffering from acute ankle sprain injury. Assessments included using of ultrasonography, water displacement, ScanGogh(II) imaging systemand two questionnaires. HB significantly inhibited nitrite release from RAW264.7, reduced wound area in HUVEC and stimulated tube formation by HUVEC and proliferationof Hs27. HB showed in vivo pro-angiogenic effect by increasing the mean sprout number in the embryos of zebrafish, therapeutic effects by increasing the thermal withdrawal latency and reducing paw thickness of rats. It also reduced the IL-6 concentration in the serum of ratsignificantly.Clinical outcomesrevealed that HB significantly reduced the edema and pain from acute ankle sprain and improved the physical movement and function of the injured ankle after the treatment.(Up to 250 words)

Xia Guo

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University , China

Title: Patellar Articular Cartilage Responses to Unloading and Laser Acupuncture

Time : 14:05 - 14:35

No Image
Biography:

Xia Guo has completed her MB in Beijing Medical University, China in 1987 and her MD study in the Medical School at the Essen University, Germany in 1994. She is Associate Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Her research interests are in bone sensory innervation and orthopaedic rehabilitation.

Abstract:

Absence of joint loading associating with markedly decrease of matrix synthesis and content production and consequently cartilage thinning. These site-specific changes of articular cartilage could be a reversible tentative phenomenon or progress to osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of laser acupuncture (LA) on the unloading-induced changes in patellar articular cartilage using ultrasonic biomicroscopy (UBM). Rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group (C), the tail-suspended group (T) and the tail-suspended with LA treatment group (L). During 28 days suspension period, rats in the group L were treated with LA at acupoints on the ST36 of left hindlimb, whereas rats in the group T had a sham treatment. Cartilage roughness, cartilage thickness and ultrasonographic score of articular cartilage at patella were measured by using an UBM system.Compared with the group C, cartilage roughness in the group T significantly (p < 0.01) increased by 60.9%, whereas cartilage roughness in the group L increased by 38.1%. In addition, unloading induced a significant cartilage thinning (p < 0.05) in the group T, whereas cartilage thickness in the group L and group C was at the similar level. There was no significant difference in ultrasonographic score of articular cartilage. The results of ultrasound measurement demonstrated that LA stimulation to ST36 could retain the quality of articular cartilage which was subjected to unloading. LA would be a simple and safe non-pharmacological countermeasure for osteoarthritis induced by unloading, such as immobilization or spaceflight.

Yang Qiuli

China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences , China

Title: Contributions of Professor XUE Chong-Cheng in Acupuncture and Neuropsychiatry

Time : 14:35 - 15:05

No Image
Biography:

Qiuli Yang completed her bachelor degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine Major in Beijing University of Chinese Medicine in July 1984. She is the researcher and the graduate student supervisor from China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences. Within the 34 years after graduation, Yang has been devoting herself in the researches, clinic and teaching in the integration of TCM and Western medicine of medical psychology, neuropsychiatry, Chinese medicine science and acupuncture. Yang, together with Professor Chongcheng Xue who is one of the experts and elder masters of the integration of TCM and Western medicine in the field of acupuncture, neuropsychiatry and medical psychology in China, established the first laboratory of Chinese medicine psychology in China and the first personality scale called “The Five-pattern Personality Inventory (FPPI)” and the scale of “Five Five Constitution Test”. The two scales specifically embody the holistic view of the harmony of body and mind according to TCM, and have been considered as one of the symbolic achievements in the discipline of Chinese medicine psychology. Yang is now serving as the director of the medical psychology laboratory in the Institute of Basic Research in Clinical Medicine in China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, and holding concurrent posts as the vice president of the Chinese Medicine Psychology Committee and Medical Psychology Committee of World Federation of Chinese Medicine Society and the Medical Psychology Committee of the Chinese Association of Chinese Medicine and the Minimally Invasive Medicine Committee of Beijing; the member of the standing committee of both the Health Care and Rehabilitation Committee and the Mental and Psychosomatic Diseases Committee of Beijing Association of Chinese Medicine; the reserve academic pacesetter of “Chinese medicine psychology”, which is one of the key disciplines cultivated by the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine of P.R.C. and the expert who conducts circuits to popularize the culture of traditional Chinese medicine.

Abstract:

Professor Chongcheng Xue (1919--2015) devoted himself to the clinical and research of integrative works in the field of TCM, acupuncture, neuropsychiatry, neurosurgery, and medicopsychology for 80 years. He confirmed that acupoints are consistent with nerve and motor points. He found propagated sensation along meridian on phantom limbs of acquired and congenital amputees. The sensation could pass over fresh incision wound and it exited and disappeared with the cortical senstion. He proposed a central theory that a model of meridian sensation is present in the brain. He suggests examination of general afferent system, cortical sensation and deep pain of syringomyelia with acupuncture as they are absent in routine method but still present during needling.  He firstly reported meridian type of sensory epilepsy and it was recognized by the Epilepsy Center of the USA. He treated psychosis with eletroacupuncture convulsive therapy, the dosage of current was less than 4% of the conventional method. The Journal of Psychiatry of USA recognized that as a dramatic progress over the past 40 years. He compiled first integrative medical questionnaire for assessment of pain. According to TCM theories and modern method of standardization he established inventories and national norms of personality and constitution for the corresponding examinations. They fulfill the gap of China. He firstly proposed the model of TCM is temporo-spatio-socio-psycho-biological and thought that the model of modern medicine would turn as it.

No Image
Biography:

Jie Liu has completed his PhD in 1992 from University of Kansas Medical Center, and certificated DABT in 1993. He has worked on metal toxicology at the NIEHS/NIH and University of Kansas Medical Center for 25 years, and served on the Editorial Board of Toxicol Sci, EHP, Toxicol Lett, and Exp Biol Med, and is now on the Editorial Board of PeerJ.  He has published more than 250 papers in peer-reviewed journals and an emeritus member of SOT and ASPET.

Abstract:

Minerals have been used in traditional medicines since ancient times, and are still in use today. Zuotai, Bhasmas, cinnabar and realgar are metallic preparations and are included in Tibetan medicines, Ayurvedra, and Chinese medicines.  Despite of their “natural” resources and the long-term medicinal use history in different cultural settings, risks can be associated with their use, especially in “self-care” practices. Heavy metal intoxication case reports are increasing in recent years, especially from lead (Pb), followed by mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As). The efficacy and safety of these herbo-metallic preparations need to be scientifically evaluated.  It should be recognized that minerals/metals used in traditional medicines undergo extensive processing procedures to alter their chemical forms (HgS, As4S4, PbS, PbO, etc.), which are different from environmental metal forms (HgCl2, MeHg, NaAsO2, NaH2AsO4, Pb(CH3COO)2, etc.).  An understanding of the processed metal forms used in traditional medicines and the use of modern technology to characterize these preparations are essential.  Minerals/metals are not used alone, rather as the polyherbal-animal-metallic preparations, a trait that is common for traditional medicines. The herbo-metal interactions are believed to assist the delivery of drugs to the target, contribute to therapeutic effects, and reduce toxicity, and discussions on the mixture basis are preferred.  The bioaccessibility, absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of the herbo-metallic preparations are different from environmental metals.  The rationale of including minerals/metals in traditional remedies and their interactions with drugs warrants scientific research.  Hormesis may explain some beneficial effects of herbo-metallic preparations at low doses, as equilibrium of metals in humans provides the basis of strong immunity and health.  However, at higher therapeutic doses, balance of the benefits and risks is critical.  The beneficial effects of any medicines often go hand-in-hand with toxicity.  “The right dose differentiates a poison from a remedy” and the use of these remedies for diseases differs from their use in physiological conditions.  The toxicity potentials of the herb-metallic traditional medicines are much less than environmental metals.  Overall, chemical forms of metals are a major determinant of their disposition, efficacy and toxicity, and the use of total Pb, Hg, and As alone on the risk assessments is not appropriate. 

Xijun Wang

Heilong jiang University of Chinese Medicine , China

Title: Emerging role of Chinmedomics: a common language to bridge traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine

Time : 15:35 - 16:05

No Image
Biography:

Xijun Wang, male, born in December 1961, got his PhD in Japan Hokkaido College of Pharmacy at 1998. Now, he has been serving as doctoral tutor and vice president of Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, general director of Chinmedomics Research Center.  He was granted National Science and Technology Progress Award in 2002, 2006 and National Technology Invention Award in 2009. He also was awarded as "National Excellent Scientist", "National excellent teachers", "youth star of national medical science and technology" and "WuJiePing Medical Innovation Award", etc. He published more than 300 academic papers, including 180 SCI papers.

Abstract:

Elucidation of the efficacy of TCMs is necessary for scientist of modern medicine to understand the advantage of TCM theory and experience, therefore a biological language to express the efficacy of TCM scientifically is needed.Syndrome and formulae (prescription) are two key issues in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), which is directly related with the efficacy of TCMs. However the vagueness of syndrome and complexity of formulae make the diagnosis and  evaluation difficulty, greatly limited the finding of effective constituents of TCMs related with the clinical efficacy. Therefore, our team has taken syndrome and formulae as the research objects, integrated serum pharmcochemistry of TCM with metabolomics technology, developed a new platform termed Chinmedomics. Briefly, using metabolomic technology to clarify the biomarker of syndrome and to evaluate the efficacy the TCM formula, and to discover the potential active constituents in the serum after oral administration of TCM formula by using serum pharmacochemistry of TCMs under the condition of the efficacy, and further analyzing the correlation between the exogenous constituents of formulae in vivo and endogenous biomarker of syndrome to find the constituents highly associated with efficacy of formulae as the effective substance.  It’s able to evaluating formulae efficacy and discovering syndrome biomarkers as well as the effective substances, finally to elucidate the scientific value of TCM. Using the Chinmedomics method, we have carried out the analysis of 15 formulae material basis and related TCM syndromes, and published more then 180 papers related with chinmedomics. At the end of 2015, the journal "Nature" gave a systematic presentation on our research work, and commented ‘Chinmedomics provides a powerful approach to evaluate the efficacy of TCM formulae; the chinmedomics approach will contribute to finding a common language to bridge TCM and western medicine’.

Ebru Özdemir Nath

Istanbul Yeni Yüzyil University , Turkey

Title: An Ethnobotanical Survey of Medicinal Plants in Gemlik (Bursa-Turkey)

Time : 16:20 - 16:50

No Image
Biography:

Ebru Özdemir Nath, PhD, Pharmacist. She completed her doctoral education at Istanbul University, Faculty of Pharmacy. Department of Pharmaceutical Botany. She did Post graduate diploma course in Yoga Therapy at Swami Vivekananda Yoga University (India). She is an Assistant Professor and since 2012 teaching Ayurvedic medicinal plants, Aromatherapy, Pharmaceutical Botany, Phytotherapy lessons to Pharmcy students at Istanbul Yeni Yuzyil University Faculty of Pharmacy.

Abstract:

Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous plants. Since their earliest origins, humans have depended on plants for their primary needs and existence. There is a rich ethnobotanical research collection in Turkey. This ethnobotanical study was planned to carried out in villages of Gemlik (Bursa-Turkey). Gemlik district has 18 villages. This study was conducted between March 2018 to May 2018. Gemlik is a town in the Bursa Province in Turkey on the southern gulf of the Sea of Marmara. During the field work 18 villages of Gemlik were visited during 25 days. The plants collected by the help of medicinal plant users and 98 people were interviewed. The plants were identified and voucher specimens prepared. These voucher specimens were kept at the Herbarium of Istanbul Yeni Yuzyil University Faculty of Pharmacy. In addition, the relative importance value of the species was determined and the informant consensus factor (FIC) was calculated for the medicinal plants researched in the study. According to the results of the identification, 105 species belonging to 43 families were used for medicinal purposes. Most of the medicinal plants used in Gemlik belong to the families Apiaceae (5 species), Brassicaceae (7 species), Compositae (13 species), Cucurbitaceae (3), Hypericaceae (3 species), Lamiaceae (12 species), Polygonaceae (4 species), Rosaceae (9 species). The most common preparations were infusion and decoction. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of hemorrhoids, respiratory diseases. dermatological diseases,  diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases. The use of traditional medicine was still widespread among the inhabitants of Gemlik region. This study helps to preserve valuable information that may otherwise be lost to future generations. Especially, the obtained results from study area will support biological activities and also chemical studies

Chun-Chuan Shih

I-Shou University , Taiwan

Title: Decreased Risk of Pneumonia in Stroke Patients Receiving Acupuncture

Time : 17:20 - 17:50

No Image
Biography:

Mr. Chun-Chuan Shih, Associate professor of the School of Chinese Medicine for Post-Baccalaureate, I-Shou University. He is the Honor President of Taipei Chinese Medical Association. He has the publications of 124 scientific article (included 30articles were ranked in SCI) and 18books in the recent five years.   

Abstract:

Acupuncture treatment is common among stroke patients, but there is limited information available on whether acupuncture effectively prevents post-stroke pneumonia. The aim of this study was to analyze the differential risk of pneumonia after stroke between patients who did and did not receive acupuncture after discharge. Methods: We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to conduct a retrospective cohort study using propensity score matched-pairs of new stroke patients in 2000-2004 who did and did not receive acupuncture post-stroke. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2009 for new-onset pneumonia. After correcting for immortal time bias, the incidence and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of pneumonia associated with acupuncture use were calculated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models.


No Image
Biography:

Emilie Auditeau has completed his PD at the age of 26 years from Toulouse University School of Pharmacy and is realizing doctoral studies from Limoges University School of Medicine. She has published various papers in the field of epilepsy and traditional medicine in Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Epilepsy & Behavior and Springer plus

Abstract:

More than 70 million people suffer epilepsy worldwide. Low availability of anti-epileptic drugs, side-effects and drug-resistant epilepsy affect the quality of life of persons with epilepsy (PWE). In Peru, a country with a high prevalence of epilepsy (16.6/1000) and Laos, a country with a high treatment gap (97.0%), herbal medicine (HM) was frequently used. Our aim was to assess and compare the use of HM in Peru and Laos. Specific objectives were to determine therapeutic strategies of PWE, to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare actors and to identify HM used to treat epilepsy. We estimated the percentage of plants used among PWE. Inclusion criterion was patients with a diagnosis confirmed by a neurologist. Information was collected thanks to structured validated questionnaire. Botanical species mentioned were identified by a botanist.In Peru, of 228 PWE included, 60.5% had used HM prescribed by a traditional healer (TH) vs 57.8% in Laos. The root of Valeriana officinalis was the HM most prescribed as 25.0% of TH recommended its use in the Peruvian communities. In Laos, HM most used were the fruit of Entada rheedii and the rhizome of Curcuma longa. Animal and mineral remedies have been associated with vegetal species and a diet prescribed. In Laos, the etiologies mentioned by PWE were fever and cranial traumatism. In Peru, PWE described epilepsy mainly as an infectious or emotional problem. This study identifies a pattern of HM use for epilepsy in Peru and Laos and will allow understanding determinants of the care pathway.